Making a Fairy House Garden

Kris and I love gardening. Last summer of 2018 we wanted to take it to a different level by experimenting on making a fairy house garden. It was a trial and error that turned out very well.

We got our materials from Bunnings and Warehouse (our favourite shops). I swear Kris and I go to that place every other week to have a window shopping date. We can stay there for half a day or even a whole day. They have got amazing coffee and food too.

We were so excited to start the project when we got home. I must confess it was me who was the most enthusiastic about this project. LOL! As evidenced by the photos.

When I was a kid I believed in fairies as tiny as Thumbelina from a children’s classic fairytale book. I must have kept the unconscious drive to build a house for the fairies since I was young.

It’s not easy to purposely break a perfect and new terracotta pot and I was hesitating to smash it with the hammer. I felt bad doing it but eventually reassured to know that I am making a beautiful fairy house project.

I started to fill the broken pot with the soil and used the broken pieces to hold the soil in place. Then I planted the flowers at the top and succulents at the bottom. Lastly, I placed the fairy house and decorated the walk path with the white pebbles. It’s that easy! Trust me.

Surprisingly, I did not realise that the fairy house light up in the dark!!What a delight to see it glowing in the garden at night. I could imagine small fairies flying around it, making their dinner then getting ready for bed.

You too could enjoy this simple project at home. For sure kids and adults would love to get involved with this great idea. It’s like gardening with a twist of art and fairytale. It’s also a reminder of something broken which may not be made whole again but can be turned into something beautiful. Gosh! it gave me a life lesson too.

Thinking of making one as well? Here’s a list of the things that you need.

  1. Large Terracotta Pot
  2. Soil
  3. Fairy House
  4. Flowers
  5. Succulents
  6. White pebbles
  7. Hammer

Enjoy! 🙂

Persistence

Photo by Samuel Scrimshaw on Unsplash

My creative journey isn’t a walk in the park. And it took me years before I was even able to take part in art shows and run exhibitions. I had a lot of those moments when the only thing that made sense was the raw and pure joy every time I pick up my brush. 
.
In her heartwarming TED talk, Elizabeth Gilbert said “Don’t be daunted. Just do your job. Continue to show up for your piece of it, whatever that might be. If your job is to dance, do your dance. If the divine, cockeyedgenius assigned to your case decides to let some sort of wonderment be glimpsed, for just one moment through your efforts, then ‘Ole!’ And if not, do your dance anyhow. And ‘Ole!’ to you, nonetheless. I believe this and I feel that we must teach it. ‘Ole!’ to you, nonetheless, just for having the sheer human love and stubbornness to keep showing up.”
.
I’m so glad I did not give up. And as long as life goes on I will keep showing up.

Created a terrible art? Here’s what you can do.

This post was originally published in Kris’ Instagram account. Featured Photo by russn_fckr on Unsplash

One of the struggles of being an artist is when you have this grand idea of how a new painting will look like and you thought you’ve figured out how to achieve your vision. But then the reality hits you that there can be a lot of trial and error involved in the process. 

I find it really painful when nothing seems to be working (the colours are not quite right, the textures are a bit odd, or I just can’t feel anything from the painting as if it has no soul). 

Photo by Dan Cook on Unsplash

These are the moments when I need to be kinder to myself. I believe being critical is important to produce quality work but I learned not to tell myself those words I would never say to someone I value and respect. Instead of saying “it’s terrible!” I choose “it’s not quite right but it’s not done yet.” 

Standing back to reflect has been very helpful in my art practice so I could maintain my sanity and not lose the joy of creating.